FINAL GIRL explores the slasher flicks of the '70s and '80s...and all the other horror movies I feel like talking about, too. This is life on the EDGE, so beware yon spoilers!

Feb 24, 2011

The Final Frame

This is the final frame from which horror film? Since y'all got yesterday's so quickly, I figure you'll know this one before I even post it!

11 comments:

Kensington said...

Ooh, I think I finally know one! This is John Carpenter's The Thing, isn't it?

Stacie Ponder said...

You got it!

I'm really bad at these things myself. :D

Erich Kuersten said...

Damn! I woulda guessed that too

Unknown said...

I thought it was Showgirls.

Synonymous said...

Man, I would've said it was that segment of Unsolved Mysteries with the crazed arsonist talking over footage he's filming of his latest crime as it happens. "LOOK AT THE FIRES, OMAR!" It turned out to be just some teenager in the end, but the video stuck in my head.

StuartOhQueue said...

I really should have known that for as many times as I've seen "The Thing." I actually wrote a lengthy comparative essay of this with the Kaufman "Body Snatchers" for my final paper in 70's and 80's cinema.

CashBailey said...

Best... Ending... Ever!

Matt Bradshaw said...

I can hear that ominous John Carpenter score in my head when I see that picture.

Anonymous said...

It's Morricone... there are some beautiful strings and orchestral tones moving underneath everything, and then that pulsing, ominous beat repeating dramatically, doom-laden throughout that reminds me of a Carpenter score... I have never read Carpenter on the music in The Thing and how it worked...

CHRIS

David Robson, Proprietor, House of Sparrows said...

I often feel like Morricone had studied Carpenter's previous work and set out to pare it down even further. I know there are quite a few people who can't believe/accept that it's NOT a Carpenter score.

Kirk H said...

John did do various cues/stingers/tones for THE THING (for example the opening sustained synth tones when the Thing-Saucer crashes on ancient earth) when he found Morricone's score to be too 'busy' for scenes that required minimalism. But the main theme is definitely Morricone (in the style of Carpenter) as are all the other orchestral cues. like the Norweigian camp sequence, for example. Carpenter said it was difficult for him to tell Morricone that some cues wouldn't be used or replaced, as he is a hero of Johns.